Home > Research Library > New Jersey Resources > New Jersey Digital Collections Highlights > New Jersey African American History Curriculum Guide: Grades 9 to 12 > Unit 10 Decade of the Twenties: From Great Migration to Great Depression > Marcus Garvey “An Appeal to the Soul of White America” (1923)

Marcus Garvey “An Appeal to the Soul of White America” (1923)

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The Negro must have a country, and a nation of his own. If you laugh at the idea, then you are selfish and wicked, for you and your children do not intend that the Negro shall discommode you in yours. If you do not want him to have a country and a nation of his own; if you do not intend to give him equal opportunities in yours; then it is plain to see that you mean that he must die, even as the Indian to make room for your generations.

Why should the Negro die? Has he not served America and the world? Has he not borne the burden of civilization in this Western world for three hundred years? Has he not contributed his best to America? Surely all this stands to his credit, but there will not be enough room and the one answer is “find a place.” We have found a place, it is Africa and as black men for three centuries have helped white men build America, surely generous and grateful white men will help black men build Africa….

Let the Negroes have a Government of their own. Don’t encourage them to believe that they will become social equals and leaders of the whites in America, without first on their own account proving to the world that they are capable of evolving a civilization of their own.

From AN APPEAL TO THE SOUL OF WHITE AMERICA by Marcus Garvey. Soper Library, Morgan State University.

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Prepared by Deborah Mercer and Edith Beckett of the New Jersey State Library.
Copyright 2003 © by the New Jersey Historical Commission,
New Jersey Department of State.
All rights reserved.
Please direct questions and comments to Deborah Mercer.
Updated:Thursday, April 24, 2003
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