Author Archives: Andrew Dauphinee

About Andrew Dauphinee

Education and learning are passions of mine. Lifelong learning is a core part of who I am and I strive pass that desire for information on to everyone I meet. As the Instruction and Outreach Librarian, it is my goal to provide quality, informative, and relevant programming to meet the diverse needs of our patrons. Please contact me regarding programming at adauphinee@njstatelib.org.

African Americans Before the NJ Supreme Court Program Recap

Thank you to Vivian Thiele from the New Jersey State Archives for an unprecedented and revealing look into how African Americans appeared before the NJ Supreme Court in numerous ways during the early colonial and post-Revolutionary War time periods.  One of most common ways Africans Americans appeared in the records of the NJ Supreme were through writs of Habeas Corpus to appear before the court for testimony as well as releases of recognizance, paid by slave owners, so that slaves were able to be “free” and work rather than remained imprisoned while awaiting a trial.   There are also instances where African Americans are named in Replevin lawsuits as stolen property, where one can also find supporting documents about the history of the individual African American, including bills of sale or transfer.  Lastly, Vivian touched on how certain judicial officials can be found repeatedly on different court documents relating to African Americans and how we can use that information as well as their decisions to glean more about their views on slavery, including early abolitionists, such as Joseph Bloomfield.

The records of the NJ Supreme Court relating to slave cases are currently being digitized and are not available online.  However, there is a online database of all of records of the NJ Supreme Court that can be filtered by different criteria, including ethnicity.  There are 463 records that can be found currently under the African American ethnicity criteria.  The database is available at https://wwwnet-dos.state.nj.us/DOS_ArchivesDBPortal/index.aspx.

 

Organizing Your Genealogy Program Recap

A big thanks to Michelle Novak, a trustee of the NJ Genealogical Society and editor of the Genealogical Society of Bergen County’s national award-winning newsletter “The Archivist”, who gave a very informative presentation on organizing your genealogy research.  Whether you are working with paper or electronic records, having clear and defined organizational strategies will help ensure that you never miss a beat.  Some takeaways from her presentation include:

  • Break down big problems into small challanges
  • Think beyond today and make sure you have actual copies (paper and electronic) of the records your are working with and make sure they are saved in multiple locations
  • Be ruthlessly consistent, especially in terms of how you organize your files as well as how you name electronic folders and files
  • Protect and share your work, particularly encouraging other family members from younger generations to appreciate all of the hard work you have done

You can download a copy of her handout below which includes all of her tips and suggestions, as well as instructions on how to save web pages as PDFs.

Organizing Your Genealogy Handout

Career Connections Presents – Master the Art of Networking Program Recap

As the job market becomes more competitive, the old adage of “It’s not what you know, but who you know” is more relevant now than ever.  Networking is a major factor when it comes to job searching, as well as securing that crucial interview.  Master the Art of Networking, presented by Career Connections, highlighted several tips for building your network and maximizing the impact of those in your network, including:

  • Network can include anyone you come in contact with on a regular basis, including friends, co-workers, social/community groups, service providers (hair stylist, doctor, accountant)
  • Use informal interviews with people in the field or profession you are interested in to gain a better understanding of what is expected from people who work in that field
  • 4 types of network contacts: sources, recommenders, decision makers, and linkers
  • Ensure that your social media profiles are professional and clear of anything that could have a negative impact on your image, such as photos, opinions, and use of language
  • Create an Elevator Pitch that is short and sums up your major goals and competencies in case you have an opportunity to meet new contact for your network or potential hiring managers

For more information on networking, please visit the Master the Art of Networking webpage from Career Connections, available at http://careerconnections.nj.gov/careerconnections/prepare/networking/master_the_art_of_networking_index.shtml.

Time and Your Bottom Line Program Recap

Thank you to Barbara Berman for her presentation Time and Your Bottom Line.  As a Certified Professional Organizer for over 10 years and multiple positions in the corporate world, she is well accustomed to demands, and sometimes, chaos of the workplace.  She covered 10 tips that all of us can use to help organize our office and increase our efficiency, many of which can be applied to our home-life as well.  Some important tips to maintain an productive and efficient workplace include:

  • setting priorities
  • systematic and logical process for organizing and naming files, both paper and electronic
  • Clear policies for when documents can be purged, and if needed, shredded
  • Have designated places for your different supplies that are easily accessible

For more tips on how to improve your efficiency and time management at work as well as home organization, visit BB’s Clutter Solutions or contact Barbara directly at info@bb-clutter-solutions.com.  You too can go from Bedlam to Brilliance!

Exploring Languages with Pronunciator Program Recap

Pronunciator is a robust, web-based language learning program that is available through the New Jersey State Library for authorized users (New Jersey state employees and students/staff of Thomas Edison State University).  It offers courses in 80 languages, which can be learned in any of 50 native languages.  It offers different learning modes, from structured Learning Guides designed to take you through the beginner, intermediate, and advanced courses to an unstructured and customizable format, allowing the user to explore the language through Postcards, film, poetry, and more.  Interactive pronunciation drills and voice comparison analysis allow the user to perfect their speech and study the language in a deeper context.  In addition, Pronunciator offers its ProLive feature for some languages, allowing users to converse with a native speaker.  To learn more, please view our webinar or search for “Pronunciator” on our Databases page.

Career Connections Presents – Top Notch Resumes 2 Program Recap

Thank you to all of the participants who joined us for Career Connections Presents – Top Notch Resumes 2.  Your resume is your opportunity to make a statement and lasting impression on the person or committee hiring for a specific position.  Here are some tips to help ensure your resume highlights your qualifications and skills:

  1.  While a chronological resume is the most widely recognized format since it emphasizes work history, a functional resume is great for recent graduates or career changes since it focuses on your skills and overall achievements rather than work history.
  2. Read through the job description and take note of all of the keywords.  Include as many of these keywords in your resume to show that meet or exceed the requirements of the job.  Also, many job applications are online and therefore first screened by a computer; including keywords from the job description will help ensure that computer does not dismiss your application.
  3. Make sure that a majority of our skills, relevant work experience, and keywords are within the first three-quarters of the first page of your resume.  You want to grab the attention of the person reading the resume right away since hiring managers tend to spend very little scanning each resume at the beginning of the process.

Top Notch Resumes 2 also touched on cover letters and references, which can be equally as important as your resume.  Follow this tips to maximize your impact on the person reading your credentials:

  1. Make sure your heading on all of your application materials is consistent.  If you papers get lost or mixed with others’ applications, it will be easily identifiable.  Also, this demonstrates your attention to detail and that you are organized.
  2. Your cover letter should not be a copy of your resume.  Refer to the job title in your cover letter and express interest in the position.  Demonstrate your ability to do the job in a few sentences, focusing on achievements and skills while also including those keywords from the job description.
  3. A cover letter should never be more than 1 page.
  4. Always provide professional references when asked, unless specifically instructed to provide personal references.

For more information on resume building as well as interview skills, finding the right career, and more, visit New Jersey Career Connections powered by the NJ Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

Coping with Behavior Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease Program Recap

Thank you to Mary Anne Ross from Alzheimer’s New Jersey for her presentation Coping with Behavior Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease in honor of National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month.  Caring for someone who has Alzheimer’s or other dementia related diseases can be a full-time job as well as overwhelming psychically and emotionally, especially when the person we love develops challenging or harmful behaviors.  Mary Anne suggests a 5 step protocol to help manage challenging behavior:

  1. Assess the situation
  2. Analyze possible causes
  3. Determine ways you can respond
  4. Intervene
  5. Evaluate

In some cases, a change in a person’s behavior can be indicative of them trying to communicate in a different way; for example, if a loved one starts becoming agitated at a certain time or becomes restless, that may indicate that they are hungry, but have just forgot how to communicate that verbally.  When dealing with any behavior, here are some tips:

  1. Stay calm and approach from the front
  2. Look for triggers to understand the behavior
  3. Don’t argue or reason
  4. Redirect to an enjoyable and safe activity

For more information, please visit the following links.

Financial Aid Information Session Program Recap

Thank you to Andre Maglione from the Higher Education Student Assistance Authority for an extremely informative presentation on preparing for the financial aspects of higher education.   Paying for college can be overwhelming, especially for parents who are unfamiliar with the process.  Being organized and proactive are keys to ensuring that you do not miss any available financial assistance available.  Completing the CSS Profile and FASFA early and accurately can dramatically alter the cost to you and your child, ensuring you get the maximum need-based aid available.  Andre also covered the details of subsidized and unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans, different federal and NJ State grants, and a variety of loans specifically for parents.  For more helpful information, please visit the links below or contact Andre Maglione via email, amaglione@hesaa.org, or phone, 609-588-3300 x1400.

Higher Education Student Assistance Authority (HESAA) – www.hesaa.org

Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) – https://fafsa.ed.gov/

College Scholarship Service (CSS) Profile – https://cssprofile.collegeboard.org/

New Jersey Grants and Scholarships – www.njgrants.org

UNIGO Scholarship Search – https://www.unigo.com/scholarships

10 Basic Financial Steps for Special Needs Caregivers Program Recap

Thank you to the Credit Union of New Jersey and Jeff Slavich for presenting an informational session on Special Needs Trusts and how they fit in to the entire financial picture regarding caring for a child or young adult with special needs.  Creating a comprehensive plan is essential for anyone who is caring for or may eventually care for anyone with special needs.  An important component of that plan may be a Special Needs Trust which allows money to be saved for later use to ensure the quality of life for someone with special needs when the primary caregivers are unable to continue their roles.  For more information on Special Needs Trusts or financial planning for anyone with special needs, please contact Jeff Slavich at 610-798-2537 or jslavich@financialguide.com.

My Genealogy Story

This past October was National Family History Month and it encouraged me to do some “light” research into my background. I use the term “light” because I was only going to focus on direct descendants and skip the siblings and extended relations. While I managed to stay on track, I must say after a month of digging, I am exhausted. I must also mention that I was only using free resources available online through the New Jersey State Library, namely Ancestry Library Edition and FamilySearch. What I thought would take a couple days, turned into weeks, marked by highs and lows.

Growing up I was always told I was 50% French Canadian through my father’s side and 25% German and 25% Italian through my mother’s side…nice and simple. Yet when my father’s mother passed away, it was revealed that she was adopted around the age of 1 and was most likely of Irish descent. A few other assumptions informed my ancestry for decades and remained unchallenged until my foray into genealogy. For one, my mother always said her Italian side came from Sicily. As for my father’s side, they were Catholics that came from New Brunswick/Nova Scotia, but on my parents’ trip up there, they could not find any concrete evidence of Catholics with my last name. Third, as far back as my parents could remember, their immediate and extended family all lived in and around the Rochester NY area, unclear of how the families actually settled there.

With those assumptions in mind and essentially framing my search strategies, I began my quest and found some surprising results. For confidentially sake, I will be using initials when talking about some of my finds. The most important part of this process was to find out more about my grandmother’s unconfirmed adoption. I already knew her maiden name thanks to my parents and surprisingly found her S.S. Application and Claim index record, listing her father and mother. Her father was S.T. and mother was E.J. Unfortunately, I was unable to find anything on E.J., but according to the 1930 census, S.T.’s wife had the same first name as E.J. So they must have married at some point and didn’t include her maiden name on the census. Actually, in a plot twist, S.T married an E.C. almost 30 years before my grandmother was born and E.C. remained his wife through the 1940 federal census. Sadly, this mystery still remains, though perhaps DNA testing through Ancestry and close inspection of the NY Vital Records unavailable through Ancestry will provide more fruitful leads.

I continued looking into my father’s French Canadian line and was able to track them pretty easily. They stayed in the same geographical area in Nova Scotia, yet listed their religion as Anglican on the Canadian censuses, which is why my parents found nothing in the Catholic records on their trip to Canada. While we cannot confirm anything, my great-great grandfather’s brother was a mariner and there was a portrait of a mariner with the same name in a restaurant my parents ate at during their Canadian excursion. Ultimately, I was able to trace my great-great-great grandfather’s birth to 1797 in Nova Scotia, but he married a woman of German descent, so it seems the French Canadian heritage is losing some ground.

Once last experience I wish to share is related to the Sicilian claim from my mother and her father that turns out is both true and false. By going through the Federal and NY state censuses as well as the NY Marriage Index, I found my great grandparents marriage information from 1901. On their record, they both list their birthplace as Niwastre Italy. Well, there is absolutely no such place as Niwastre in Italy or Sicily. Given the high probability for human error in recording that information, I was able to find a small Italian commune, the Italian version of a small city or village, by the name of Nicastro in southern Italy. Can I definitely say this is the correct city, no, but the fact that you only need to replace two letters and the myriad of misspellings in official documents throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it is a fair assumption that this was their birth place. Lucky for me, out of all of the communes and cities within the province of Catanzaro (where Nicastro resides in Italy) whose records are available online, Nicastro records are the only ones that were transferred to the Italian State Archives and unavailable online. So while I can’t trace that line back any farther, I did find out that Italy did not exist as a unified country until 1861. Previous to 1861, everything from roughly Naples south on the mainland was considered the Kingdom of Two Sicilies. Were my ancestors proud of that heritage and therefore referred to the old country as Sicily; it’s possible. But like so many instances in genealogy, possible is not proof.

To wrap up my ramblings, I’d like to point out a couple things. First, while the online resources available through Ancestry and FamilySearch are incredible and a wonderful source for starting your research, there are so many other resources available at state and local archives, public libraries, and churches that can include new or corroborating evidence so do not be afraid to visit, call, or email those places. Second, genealogy research is a great opportunity to bring family closer together. Whether everyone participates in the research or just adds to the family lore through stories, genealogical research is a powerful force. I hope I have inspired some of you to take a closer look at your ancestry and please visit the New Jersey State Library, both in person and online, to see our Genealogy Collection and resources.

Using Ancestry.com DNA Results to Solve Genealogical Mysteries Program Recap

Thank you to all of those who made our National Family History Month programming a HUGE success.  We ended the month on look toward the future of genealogical research thanks to a presentation by Joseph Klett, Director of the New Jersey State Archives, on using Ancestry.com’s DNA feature.  Topics covered included:

  • The logistics and fees of the test, including managing multiple individual’s test results
  • A breakdown of the test results including a discussion on autosomal DNA testing and how the amount of centimorgans can indicate familial relationships
  • Connecting with other Ancestry.com members who share common DNA lineages
  • How to apply the DNA results and new connections to current genealogical research inquiries

This session was recorded so please check back for a link to the recording once it has been edited and formatted.  If you do not have an Ancestry account, you can use Ancestry Library Edition for free by visiting the New Jersey State Library or the New Jersey State Archives in person.  You can also check your local public library for access to Ancestry.  Please visit https://www.ancestry.com/dna/ to learn more about Ancestry’s DNA testing.

If you have any questions regarding genealogy, please visit our Genealogy Research Guide, contact our Genealogy Librarian Regina Fitzpatrick, or the New Jersey State Archives.

Breast Health Lecture Recap

Thank you to Patricia Tatrai for speaking on breast health during Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  Her talk focused on several different aspects of breast health and cancer including:

  • Risk factors, including hereditary occurrences of caner and certain genetic markers
  • Different types of breast cancer
  • Different types of screenings for breast cancer
  • Ways to reduce the risks of breast cancer including diet, exercise, and preventative mastectomy

Please consult with your doctor about any questions you have about breast cancer, including risks, tests, and treatments.