New Books (December 6, 2019)

Cover image for the book Facebook, the Media, and Democracy

New eBooks

Our featured eBook is Facebook, the Media, and Democracy

This book examines Facebook Inc. and the impact that it has had, and continues to have, on media and democracy around the world. Drawing on interviews with Facebook users of different kinds, and dialogue with politicians, regulators, civil society and media commentators, as well as detailed documentary scrutiny of legislative and regulatory proposals, and Facebook’s corporate statements, the book presents a comprehensive, but clear, overview of the current debate around Facebook and the global debate on the regulation of social media in the era of ‘surveillance capitalism.’ Chapters examine the business and growing institutional power of Facebook as it has unfolded over the fifteen years since its creation, the benefits and meanings that it has provided for its users, its disruptive challenge to the contemporary media environment, its shaping of conversations, and the emerging calls for its further regulation. The book considers Facebook’s alleged role in the rise of democratic movements around the world, as well as its suggested role in the election of Donald Trump, and the UK vote to leave the European Union. This book argues that Facebook, in some shape or form, is likely to be with us into the foreseeable future, and that how we address the societal challenges that it provokes, and the economic system that underpins it, will define how human societies demonstrate their capacity to protect and enhance democracy, and ensure that no corporation can set itself above democratic institutions. This is an important research volume for academics and researchers in the areas of media studies, communications, social media and political science.

To view this title, and other titles in this collection, start with the New eBooks Research Guide.

eBook access is restricted to New Jersey State employees and Thomas Edison State University staff and students.

 EBSCO eBooks are available in PDF and ePub formats. You can read them online and download them to many devices. Not sure how to do that? Grab your State Library borrower’s card, and see this guide to checking out and downloading EBSCO ebooks, and this guide to reading EBSCO eBooks on your mobile devices.

Still have questions? You can send an email to Reference Services at refdesk@njstatelib.org, or speak with Reference staff at 609-278-2640 x103, Monday to Friday, from 8:30 am to 5:00pm.


New Print Books

To borrow any of these books from us, simply click on the “Request Book” link under the title of interest, and use your State Library borrower’s card to request the book directly through the Library’s catalog. Not sure how to do that? See this short tutorial on how to request a book in the catalog.

Borrowers may also request these titles from the NJ State Library by sending an email to: circulation@njstatelib.org, or by contacting the Circulation Desk at 609-278-2640 x104, Monday to Friday, from 8:30 am to 5:00pm.

Lincoln's Spies: Their Secret War to Save a Nation

Lincoln's Spies: Their Secret War to Save a Nation

by Douglas C. Waller

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Call number: 973.785 Wal

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

A major addition to the history of the Civil War, Lincoln’s Spies is a riveting account of the secret battles waged by Union agents to save a nation. Filled with espionage, sabotage, and intrigue, it is also a striking portrait of a shrewd president who valued what his operatives uncovered. Veteran journalist Douglas Waller turns his sights on the shadow war of four secret agents for the North—three men and one woman. From the tense days before Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration in 1861 to the surrender at Appomattox four years later, Waller delivers a fast-paced narrative of the heroes—and scoundrels—who informed Lincoln’s generals on the enemy positions for crucial battles and busted up clandestine Rebel networks. Behind these secret operatives was a president, one of our greatest, who was an avid consumer of intelligence and a ruthless aficionado of clandestine warfare, willing to take chances to win the war. Lincoln’s Spies, as Waller vividly depicts in his excellent new book, set the template for the dark arts the CIA would practice in the future.

Dreams of El Dorado: A History of the American West

Dreams of El Dorado: A History of the American West

by H.W. Brands

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Call number: 978.02 Bra

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Basic Books

In Dreams of El Dorado, H. W. Brands tells the thrilling, panoramic story of the settling of the American West. He takes us from John Jacob Astor's fur trading outpost in Oregon to the Texas Revolution, from the California gold rush to the Oklahoma land rush. He shows how the migrants' dreams drove them to feats of courage and perseverance that put their stay-at-home cousins to shame-and how those same dreams also drove them to outrageous acts of violence against indigenous peoples and one another. The West was where riches would reward the miner's persistence, the cattleman's courage, the railroad man's enterprise; but El Dorado was at least as elusive in the West as it ever was in the East.

Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don't Know

Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don't Know

by Malcolm Gladwell

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Call number: 302 Gla

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Brown and Company, Little

Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Outliers, offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers -- and why they often go wrong. How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation? Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to each other that isn't true? Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don't know. And because we don't know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world.

Last Witnesses: An Oral History of the Children of World War II

Last Witnesses: An Oral History of the Children of World War II

by Svetlana Alexievich

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Call number: 940.53 Ale

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Random House

Bringing together dozens of voices in her distinctive style, Last Witnesses is Alexievich’s collection of the memories of those who were children during World War II. They had sometimes been soldiers as well as witnesses, and their generation grew up with the trauma of the war deeply embedded—a trauma that would change the course of the Russian nation. Collectively, this symphony of children’s stories, filled with the everyday details of life in combat, reveals an altogether unprecedented view of the war. Alexievich gives voice to those whose memories have been lost in the official narratives, uncovering a powerful, hidden history from the personal and private experiences of individuals.

On the Plain of Snakes: A Mexican Journey

On the Plain of Snakes: A Mexican Journey

by Paul Theroux

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Call number: 917.204 The

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Legendary travel writer Paul Theroux drives the entire length of the US–Mexico border, then goes deep into the hinterland, on the back roads of Chiapas and Oaxaca, to uncover the rich, layered world behind today’s brutal headlines. Paul Theroux has spent his life crisscrossing the globe in search of the histories and peoples that give life to the places they call home. Now, as immigration debates boil around the world, Theroux has set out to explore a country key to understanding our current discourse: Mexico. Just south of the Arizona border, in the desert region of Sonora, he finds a place brimming with vitality, yet visibly marked by both the US Border Patrol looming to the north and mounting discord from within. With the same humanizing sensibility he employed in Deep South, Theroux stops to talk with residents, visits Zapotec mill workers in the highlands, and attends a Zapatista party meeting, communing with people of all stripes who remain south of the border even as their families brave the journey north.

Rebel Richmond: Life and Death in the Confederate Capital

Rebel Richmond: Life and Death in the Confederate Capital

by Stephen V. Ash

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Call number: 975.545 Ash

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: University of North Carolina Press

In Rebel Richmond, Stephen V. Ash vividly evokes life in Richmond as war consumed the Confederate capital. He guides readers from the city's alleys, homes, and shops to its churches, factories, and halls of power, uncovering the intimate daily drama of a city transformed and ultimately destroyed by war. Drawing on the stories and experiences of civilians and soldiers, slaves and masters, refugees and prisoners, merchants and laborers, preachers and prostitutes, the sick and the wounded, Ash delivers a captivating new narrative of the Civil War's impact on a city and its people.

Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home

Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home

by Richard Bell

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Call number: 306.362 Bel

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: 37 Ink

Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of kidnappers and slavers in the United States. Lured onto a small ship with the promise of food and pay, they are instead met with blindfolds, ropes, and knives. Over four long months, their kidnappers drive them overland into the Cotton Kingdom to be sold as slaves. Determined to resist, the boys form a tight brotherhood as they struggle to free themselves and find their way home. Their ordeal—an odyssey that takes them from the Philadelphia waterfront to the marshes of Mississippi and then onward still—shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of legally free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War.

Coaching Copyright

Coaching Copyright

by Erin L. Ellis, Kevin L. Smith

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Call number: 346.73 Smi

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: ALA Editions American Library Association

This guide contains 10 chapters that help librarians assist patrons with copyright questions in educational contexts, focusing on coaching as a framework for addressing copyright problems and issues, and techniques for teaching about copyright to various audiences. It describes what it means to be a copyright coach, a framework for dealing with specific issues, and legal and practical considerations; coaching copyright in the context of library instruction, including how copyright education is typically delivered, the necessity for copyright education as an information literacy concept, and its overlap with high-impact practices, as well as situations librarians might encounter; and case studies by specialists in library instruction and copyright, in relation to connecting with the audience, using storytelling and role-playing to convey copyright topics, working with undergraduate research journals, working with instructional designers, helping administrators understand copyright on campus, and a research study on the effectiveness of a library and information science class on legal issues.

Casting Light on the Dark Web: A Guide for Safe Exploration

Casting Light on the Dark Web: A Guide for Safe Exploration

by Brady Lund, Matthew Beckstrom

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Call number: 025.042 Bec

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

Covers topics from what the dark web is, to how it works, to how you can use it, to some of the myths surrounding it. Casting Light on the Dark Web: A Guide for Safe Exploration is an easy-to-read and comprehensive guide to understanding how the Dark Web works and why you should be using it! Readers will be led on a tour of this elusive technology from how to download the platform for personal or public use, to how it can best be utilized for finding information. This guide busts myths and informs readers, while remaining jargon-free and entertaining. Useful for people of all levels of internet knowledge and experience.

Beyond Team Building: How to Build High Performing Teams and the Culture to Support Them

Beyond Team Building: How to Build High Performing Teams and the Culture to Support Them

by Gibb Dyer, Jeffrey Dyer

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Call number: 658.402 Dye

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Wiley

Beyond Team Building: How to Build High Performing Teams and the Culture to Support Them represents the latest in thinking about creating effective teams. The authors present a new “Five C” framework that focuses on the core aspects of team building. The book helps the reader assess how his/her team is performing on each of the 5Cs—context, composition, competencies, change, and collaborative leadership, and discusses options concerning how to improve team performance along each of these dimensions.

Sweet Taste of Liberty: A True Story of Slavery and Restitution in America

Sweet Taste of Liberty: A True Story of Slavery and Restitution in America

by W. Caleb McDaniel

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Call number: 306.362 McD

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Born into slavery, Henrietta Wood was taken to Cincinnati and legally freed in 1848. In 1853, a Kentucky deputy sheriff named Zebulon Ward colluded with Wood's employer, abducted her, and sold her back into bondage. She remained enslaved throughout the Civil War, giving birth to a son in Mississippi and never forgetting who had put her in this position. By 1869, Wood had obtained her freedom for a second time and returned to Cincinnati, where she sued Ward for damages in 1870. Astonishingly, after eight years of litigation, Wood won her case: in 1878, a Federal jury awarded her $2,500. The decision stuck on appeal. More important than the amount, though the largest ever awarded by an American court in restitution for slavery, was the fact that any money was awarded at all. By the time the case was decided, Ward had become a wealthy businessman and a pioneer of convict leasing in the South. Wood's son later became a prominent Chicago lawyer, and she went on to live until 1912.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Books: The History and Future of Reading

What We Talk About When We Talk About Books: The History and Future of Reading

by Leah Price

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Call number: 028 Pri

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Basic Books

Digital-age pundits warn that as our appetite for books dwindles, so too do the virtues in which printed, bound objects once trained us: the willpower to focus on a sustained argument, the curiosity to look beyond the day's news, the willingness to be alone. The shelves of the world's great libraries, though, tell a more complicated story. Examining the wear and tear on the books that they contain, English professor Leah Price finds scant evidence that a golden age of reading ever existed. From the dawn of mass literacy to the invention of the paperback, most readers already skimmed and multitasked. Print-era doctors even forbade the very same silent absorption now recommended as a cure for electronic addictions. The evidence that books are dying proves even scarcer. In encounters with librarians, booksellers and activists who are reinventing old ways of reading, Price offers fresh hope to bibliophiles and literature lovers alike.

See the New Books Blog page to view additional titles.