New Books (March 13, 2020)

Featured eBook

Our featured eBook is Universal Healthcare

This accessibly written book explains universal healthcare; the many forms it can take; and the issues, debates, and historical context underpinning the continued struggle for its implementation in the United States. Part I provides an overview of the universal healthcare landscape. Universal healthcare may be defined as any healthcare system that ensures at least basic coverage to most, if not all, citizens of a country. Although it may be implemented in many ways, universal healthcare has been widely accepted by international humanitarian organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) as the best way to ensure the universal human right to health. So why is the United States the only industrialized country without universal healthcare? What are the political, social, and economic factors that have prevented its successful introduction? Universal Healthcare explores what universal healthcare is, the many forms it can take—using examples from countries around the world—and the tumultuous history of attempts to implement a system of universal healthcare in the United States. Part II delves into the contentious issues and debates surrounding adoption of universal healthcare in the United States.  Lastly, Part III provides a variety of useful materials, including case studies, a timeline of critical events, a glossary, and a directory of resources.

To view this title, and other titles in this collection, start with the New eBooks Research Guide.

eBook access is restricted to New Jersey State employees and Thomas Edison State University staff and students.

 EBSCO eBooks are available in PDF and ePub formats. You can read them online and download them to many devices. Not sure how to do that? Grab your State Library borrower’s card, and see this guide to checking out and downloading EBSCO ebooks, and this guide to reading EBSCO eBooks on your mobile devices.

Still have questions? You can send an email to Reference Services at refdesk@njstatelib.org, or speak with Reference staff at 609-278-2640 x103, Monday to Friday, from 8:30 am to 5:00pm.


New Print Books

To borrow any of these books from us, simply click on the “Request Book” link under the title of interest, and use your State Library borrower’s card to request the book directly through the Library’s catalog. Not sure how to do that? See this short tutorial on how to request a book in the catalog.

Borrowers may also request these titles from the NJ State Library by sending an email to: circulation@njstatelib.org, or by contacting the Circulation Desk at 609-278-2640 x104, Monday to Friday, from 8:30 am to 5:00pm.

America's Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today

America's Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today

by Pamela S. Nadell

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Call number: 305.48 Nad

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: W. W. Norton Company

Pamela S. Nadell weaves together the complex story of Jewish women in America—from colonial-era matriarch Grace Nathan and her great-granddaughter, poet Emma Lazarus, to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Recounting how Jewish women have been at the forefront of social, economic, and political causes for centuries, Nadell shows them fighting for suffrage, labor unions, civil rights, feminism, and religious rights—shaping a distinctly Jewish American identity.

A Bound Woman Is a Dangerous Thing: The Incarceration of African American Women from Harriet Tubman to Sandra Bland

A Bound Woman Is a Dangerous Thing: The Incarceration of African American Women from Harriet Tubman to Sandra Bland

by DaMaris B. Hill

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Call number: 305.48 Hil

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

From Harriet Tubman to Assata Shakur, Ida B. Wells to Sandra Bland and Black Lives Matter, black women freedom fighters have braved violence, scorn, despair, and isolation in order to lodge their protests. In A Bound Woman Is a Dangerous Thing, DaMaris Hill honors their experiences with at times harrowing, at times hopeful responses to her heroes, illustrated with black-and-white photographs throughout. For black American women, the experience of being bound has taken many forms: from the bondage of slavery to the Reconstruction-era criminalization of women; from the brutal constraints of Jim Crow to our own era’s prison industrial complex, where between 1980 and 2014, the number of incarcerated women increased by 700%. For those women who lived and died resisting the dehumanization of confinement--physical, social, intellectual--the threat of being bound was real, constant, and lethal.

Pocahontas and the English Boys: Caught Between Cultures in Early Virginia

Pocahontas and the English Boys: Caught Between Cultures in Early Virginia

by Karen Ordahl Kupperman

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Call number: 975.501 Kup

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: New York University Press

In Pocahontas and the English Boys, the esteemed historian Karen Ordahl Kupperman shifts the lens on the well-known narrative of Virginia’s founding to reveal the previously untold and utterly compelling story of the youths who, often unwillingly, entered into cross-cultural relationships—and became essential for the colony’s survival. Their story gives us unprecedented access to both sides of early Virginia. Here for the first time outside scholarly texts is an accurate portrayal of Pocahontas, who, from the age of ten, acted as emissary for her father, who ruled over the local tribes, alongside the never-before-told intertwined stories of Thomas Savage, Henry Spelman, and Robert Poole, young English boys who were forced to live with powerful Indian leaders to act as intermediaries.

Transform and Thrive: Ideas to Invigorate Your Library and Your Community

Transform and Thrive: Ideas to Invigorate Your Library and Your Community

by Dorothy Stoltz

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Call number: 023 Sto

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2018

Publisher: ALA Editions

Stoltz, who works in community engagement at a public library, et al. share ideas for creating new roles for librarians and libraries of any size to improve and thrive. They describe how to develop a culture that reduces groupthink, encourages learning and unlearning, and values intelligent risk-taking; reflect on library customer service concepts of respect and goodwill and why going beyond the call of duty will be standard in libraries of the future; lead from any position to practice integrity, grace, and patience and transform the library from a book repository into a community anchor; and refresh librarians’ minds and activate creativity to avoid getting stuck in the past and respond to problems, challenges, or barriers.

Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism: And Other Arguments for Economic Independence

Why Women Have Better Sex Under Socialism: And Other Arguments for Economic Independence

by Kristen R. Ghodsee

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Call number: 335 Gho

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2018

Publisher: Bold Type Books

In a witty, irreverent op-ed piece that went viral, Kristen Ghodsee argued that women had better sex under socialism. The response was tremendous -- clearly she articulated something many women had sensed for years: the problem is with capitalism, not with us. Ghodsee, an acclaimed ethnographer and professor of Russian and East European Studies, spent years researching what happened to women in countries that transitioned from state socialism to capitalism. She argues here that unregulated capitalism disproportionately harms women, and that we should learn from the past. By rejecting the bad and salvaging the good, we can adapt some socialist ideas to the 21st century and improve our lives. She tackles all aspects of a woman's life - work, parenting, sex and relationships, citizenship, and leadership. In a chapter called "Women: Like Men, But Cheaper," she talks about women in the workplace, discussing everything from the wage gap to harassment and discrimination. In "What To Expect When You're Expecting Exploitation," she addresses motherhood and how "having it all" is impossible under capitalism. A spirited, deeply researched exploration of why capitalism is bad for women and how, when done right, socialism leads to economic independence, better labor conditions, better work-life balance and, yes, even better sex.

The Mastermind: Drugs. Empire. Murder. Betrayal.

The Mastermind: Drugs. Empire. Murder. Betrayal.

by Evan Ratliff

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Call number: 364.109 Rat

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Random House

It all started as an online prescription drug network, supplying hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of painkillers to American customers. It would not stop there. Before long, the business had turned into a sprawling multinational conglomerate engaged in almost every conceivable aspect of criminal mayhem. Yachts carrying $100 million in cocaine. Safe houses in Hong Kong filled with gold bars. Shipments of methamphetamine from North Korea. Weapons deals with Iran. Mercenary armies in Somalia. Teams of hit men in the Philippines. Encryption programs so advanced that the government could not break them. The man behind it all, pulling the strings from a laptop in Manila, was Paul Calder Le Roux, a reclusive programmer turned criminal genius who could only exist in the networked world of the twenty-first century, and the kind of self-made crime boss that American law enforcement had never imagined.

Open Mic Night in Moscow: And Other Stories from My Search for Black Markets, Soviet Architecture, and Emotionally Unavailable Russian Men

Open Mic Night in Moscow: And Other Stories from My Search for Black Markets, Soviet Architecture, and Emotionally Unavailable Russian Men

by Audrey Murray

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Call number: 792.76 Mur

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2018

Publisher: William Morrow

The raucous and surprisingly poignant story of a young, Russia-obsessed American writer and comedian who embarked on a solo tour of the former Soviet Republics, never imagining that it would involve kidnappers, garbage bags of money, and encounters with the weird and wonderful from Mongolia to Tajikistan. Kazakhstan, Belarus, and Siberia are not the typical tourist destinations of a twenty-something, nor the places one usually goes to eat, pray, and/or love. But the mix of imperial Russian opulence and Soviet decay, and the allure of emotionally unavailable Russian men proved strangely irresistible to comedian Audrey Murray. A blend of memoir and offbeat travel guide, this thoughtful, hilarious catalog of a young comedian's adventures is also a diary of her emotional discoveries about home, love, patriotism, loneliness, and independence.

Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet

Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet

by Claire L. Evans

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Call number: 004.092 Eva

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2018

Publisher: Portfolio

The history of technology you probably know is one of men and machines, garages and riches, alpha nerds and brogrammers--but from Ada Lovelace, who wrote the first computer program in the Victorian Age, to the cyberpunk Web designers of the 1990s, female visionaries have always been at the vanguard of technology and innovation. In fact, women turn up at the very beginning of every important wave in technology. They may have been hidden in plain sight, their inventions and contributions touching our lives in ways we don't even realize, but they have always been part of the story. This inspiring call to action shines a light on the bright minds whom history forgot, and shows us how they will continue to shape our world in ways we can no longer ignore.

The Company They Keep: How Partisan Divisions Came to the Supreme Court

The Company They Keep: How Partisan Divisions Came to the Supreme Court

by Lawrence Baum, Neal Devins

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Call number: 347.73 Dev

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

As the eminent law and politics scholars Neal Devins and Lawrence Baum show in The Company They Keep, justices today are reacting far more to subtle social forces in their own elite legal world than to pressure from the other branches of government or mass public opinion. In particular, the authors draw from social psychology research to show why Justices are apt to follow the lead of the elite social networks that they are a part of. The evidence is strong: Justices take cues primarily from the people who are closest to them and whose approval they care most about: political, social, and professional elites. In an era of strong partisan polarization, elite social networks are largely bifurcated by partisan and ideological loyalties, and the Justices reflect that division. The result is a Court in which the Justices' ideological stances reflect the dominant views in the appointing president's party. A fascinating examination of the factors that shape decision-making, The Company They Keep will reshape our understanding of how political polarization occurs on the contemporary Supreme Court.

The Empire and the Five Kings: America's Abdication and the Fate of the World

The Empire and the Five Kings: America's Abdication and the Fate of the World

by Bernard-Henri Lévy

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Call number: 327.73 Lev

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.

One of the West’s leading intellectuals offers a provocative look at America’s withdrawal from world leadership and the rising powers who seek to fill the vacuum left behind. The United States was once the hope of the world, a beacon of freedom and the defender of liberal democracy. Nations and peoples on all continents looked to America to stand up for the values that created the Western worldand to oppose autocracy and repression. Even when America did not live up to its ideals, it still recognized their importance, at home and abroad. But as Bernard-Henri Lévy lays bare in this powerful and disturbing analysis of the world today, America is retreating from its traditional leadership role, and in its place have come five ambitious powers, former empires eager to assert their primacy and influence. Lévy shows how these five—Russia, China, Turkey, Iran, and Sunni radical Islamism—are taking steps to undermine the liberal values that have been a hallmark of Western civilization.

Nervous States: Democracy and the Decline of Reason

Nervous States: Democracy and the Decline of Reason

by William Davies

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Call number: 320.01 Dav

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2019

Publisher: W. W. Norton Company

In this sweeping and provocative work, political economist William Davies draws on a four-hundred-year history of ideas to reframe our understanding of the contemporary world. He argues that global trends decades and even centuries in the making have reduced a world of logic and fact into one driven by emotions—particularly fear and anxiety. This has ushered in an age of “nervous states,” both in our individual bodies and our body politic.Eloquently tracing the history of accounting, statistics, science, and human anatomy from the Enlightenment to the present, Davies shows how we invented expertise in the seventeenth century to calm the violent disputes—over God and the nature of reality—that ravaged Europe. By separating truth from emotion, scientific, testable facts paved a way out of constant warfare and established a basis for consensus, which became the bedrock of modern politics, business, and democracy.

How Democracies Die: What History Reveals About Our Future

How Democracies Die: What History Reveals About Our Future

by Daniel Ziblatt, Steven Levitsky

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Call number: 321.8 Lev

Collection: Browsing Collection

Published: 2018

Publisher: Crown Publishing Group (NY)

Donald Trump’s presidency has raised a question that many of us never thought we’d be asking: Is our democracy in danger? Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt have spent more than twenty years studying the breakdown of democracies in Europe and Latin America, and they believe the answer is yes. Democracy no longer ends with a bang—in a revolution or military coup—but with a whimper: the slow, steady weakening of critical institutions, such as the judiciary and the press, and the gradual erosion of long-standing political norms. The good news is that there are several exit ramps on the road to authoritarianism. The bad news is that, by electing Trump, we have already passed the first one. Drawing on decades of research and a wide range of historical and global examples, from 1930s Europe to contemporary Hungary, Turkey, and Venezuela, to the American South during Jim Crow, Levitsky and Ziblatt show how democracies die—and how ours can be saved.

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