Tag Archives: Research Library

Introduction to Finding Grants

Are you new to the field of grant seeking?

Discover what funders are looking for in nonprofits seeking grants and how to find potential funders in this introductory course.

You will learn the 10 most important things you need to know about finding grants, including:

  • Who funds nonprofits and what are their motivations.
  • What do funders really want to know about the organizations they are interested in funding.
  • How do you identify potential funders and make the first approach.
  • The class will end with hands-on, guided online grant research.

 

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Coping with Behavior Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease Program Recap

Thank you to Mary Anne Ross from Alzheimer’s New Jersey for her presentation Coping with Behavior Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease in honor of National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month.  Caring for someone who has Alzheimer’s or other dementia related diseases can be a full-time job as well as overwhelming psychically and emotionally, especially when the person we love develops challenging or harmful behaviors.  Mary Anne suggests a 5 step protocol to help manage challenging behavior:

  1. Assess the situation
  2. Analyze possible causes
  3. Determine ways you can respond
  4. Intervene
  5. Evaluate

In some cases, a change in a person’s behavior can be indicative of them trying to communicate in a different way; for example, if a loved one starts becoming agitated at a certain time or becomes restless, that may indicate that they are hungry, but have just forgot how to communicate that verbally.  When dealing with any behavior, here are some tips:

  1. Stay calm and approach from the front
  2. Look for triggers to understand the behavior
  3. Don’t argue or reason
  4. Redirect to an enjoyable and safe activity

For more information, please visit the following links.

Coping with Behavior Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease

 

In honor of National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, the NJSL is partnering with Alzheimer’s New Jersey to bring you “Coping with Behavior Changes in Alzheimer’s Disease.”  Behavioral changes in Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia can pose concerns for family caregivers.  As the disease progresses, behavior often becomes the primary way people with the disease communicate their needs.  Learn why people with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia experience behavior changes, what those behaviors mean, and how to cope when behaviors are challenging.

 

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Discover the NEW Foundation Directory Online

 

The Foundation Center’s Foundation Directory Online (FDO) database has a new look!   While still providing users with access to over 140,000 grant funder profiles and details on 8.5 million previously-awarded grants, the redesigned FDO makes finding prospective funders even easier.  Come and learn about how the changes to Foundation Directory Online can make your search for funding more effective and efficient.  Participants will have time at the end of this program for individual hands-on grant research with the New FDO.  This program is most appropriate for those who have previously used Foundation Directory Online.  For those new to the field of grant seeking, we encourage you to attend our Intro to Finding Grants class on December 6th.

 

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Financial Aid Information Session

November is National Scholarship Awareness Month and as college applications come due, the burdens of college financing can be overwhelming.  Paying for college can be a complex and confusing process, from finding scholarships, to applying for financial aid, to determining which student loans are the best fit.   Andre Maglione, Acting Director of Student Aid Services from The Higher Education Student Assistance Authority, will help to clear the confusion through their Financial Aid Information Session.  This session will provide useful information on all of the Federal and State grants, scholarships and loan programs available through the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).  Key information and requirements on filing the FAFSA are covered.  In addition,  college cost of attendance, the expected family contribution and their combined role in determining aid will also be covered.

 

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10 Basic Financial Steps for Special Needs Caregivers

The day to day responsibilities of a caregiver can be stressful enough, let alone having to manage someone else’s financial situation.  To help caregivers improve their financial literacy and confidence in managing other people’s finances, the Credit Union of New Jersey has created a 3 part seminar series surrounding financial responsibilities of special needs caregivers.  The first part, 10 Basic Financial Steps for Special Needs Caregivers, will discuss 10 basic steps to help caregivers get started in preparing for the financial future of their dependent with special needs.  As a caregiver of a dependent with special needs the single most important issue on your mind, regardless of the age of the dependent, is what will happen to my dependent after I’m gone.  There are some needs that will always be present and they must be carefully considered and planned for appropriately.  This workshop addresses such critical issues as applying for government benefits for Social Security and Medicaid, creating a Special Needs Trust, the importance of a Will and considering a Letter of Intent.  Taking these 10 basic steps now can help ensure the type of care and quality of life for a loved one’s well-being today and tomorrow.

 

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My Genealogy Story

This past October was National Family History Month and it encouraged me to do some “light” research into my background. I use the term “light” because I was only going to focus on direct descendants and skip the siblings and extended relations. While I managed to stay on track, I must say after a month of digging, I am exhausted. I must also mention that I was only using free resources available online through the New Jersey State Library, namely Ancestry Library Edition and FamilySearch. What I thought would take a couple days, turned into weeks, marked by highs and lows.

Growing up I was always told I was 50% French Canadian through my father’s side and 25% German and 25% Italian through my mother’s side…nice and simple. Yet when my father’s mother passed away, it was revealed that she was adopted around the age of 1 and was most likely of Irish descent. A few other assumptions informed my ancestry for decades and remained unchallenged until my foray into genealogy. For one, my mother always said her Italian side came from Sicily. As for my father’s side, they were Catholics that came from New Brunswick/Nova Scotia, but on my parents’ trip up there, they could not find any concrete evidence of Catholics with my last name. Third, as far back as my parents could remember, their immediate and extended family all lived in and around the Rochester NY area, unclear of how the families actually settled there.

With those assumptions in mind and essentially framing my search strategies, I began my quest and found some surprising results. For confidentially sake, I will be using initials when talking about some of my finds. The most important part of this process was to find out more about my grandmother’s unconfirmed adoption. I already knew her maiden name thanks to my parents and surprisingly found her S.S. Application and Claim index record, listing her father and mother. Her father was S.T. and mother was E.J. Unfortunately, I was unable to find anything on E.J., but according to the 1930 census, S.T.’s wife had the same first name as E.J. So they must have married at some point and didn’t include her maiden name on the census. Actually, in a plot twist, S.T married an E.C. almost 30 years before my grandmother was born and E.C. remained his wife through the 1940 federal census. Sadly, this mystery still remains, though perhaps DNA testing through Ancestry and close inspection of the NY Vital Records unavailable through Ancestry will provide more fruitful leads.

I continued looking into my father’s French Canadian line and was able to track them pretty easily. They stayed in the same geographical area in Nova Scotia, yet listed their religion as Anglican on the Canadian censuses, which is why my parents found nothing in the Catholic records on their trip to Canada. While we cannot confirm anything, my great-great grandfather’s brother was a mariner and there was a portrait of a mariner with the same name in a restaurant my parents ate at during their Canadian excursion. Ultimately, I was able to trace my great-great-great grandfather’s birth to 1797 in Nova Scotia, but he married a woman of German descent, so it seems the French Canadian heritage is losing some ground.

Once last experience I wish to share is related to the Sicilian claim from my mother and her father that turns out is both true and false. By going through the Federal and NY state censuses as well as the NY Marriage Index, I found my great grandparents marriage information from 1901. On their record, they both list their birthplace as Niwastre Italy. Well, there is absolutely no such place as Niwastre in Italy or Sicily. Given the high probability for human error in recording that information, I was able to find a small Italian commune, the Italian version of a small city or village, by the name of Nicastro in southern Italy. Can I definitely say this is the correct city, no, but the fact that you only need to replace two letters and the myriad of misspellings in official documents throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it is a fair assumption that this was their birth place. Lucky for me, out of all of the communes and cities within the province of Catanzaro (where Nicastro resides in Italy) whose records are available online, Nicastro records are the only ones that were transferred to the Italian State Archives and unavailable online. So while I can’t trace that line back any farther, I did find out that Italy did not exist as a unified country until 1861. Previous to 1861, everything from roughly Naples south on the mainland was considered the Kingdom of Two Sicilies. Were my ancestors proud of that heritage and therefore referred to the old country as Sicily; it’s possible. But like so many instances in genealogy, possible is not proof.

To wrap up my ramblings, I’d like to point out a couple things. First, while the online resources available through Ancestry and FamilySearch are incredible and a wonderful source for starting your research, there are so many other resources available at state and local archives, public libraries, and churches that can include new or corroborating evidence so do not be afraid to visit, call, or email those places. Second, genealogy research is a great opportunity to bring family closer together. Whether everyone participates in the research or just adds to the family lore through stories, genealogical research is a powerful force. I hope I have inspired some of you to take a closer look at your ancestry and please visit the New Jersey State Library, both in person and online, to see our Genealogy Collection and resources.

Breast Health Lecture Recap

Thank you to Patricia Tatrai for speaking on breast health during Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  Her talk focused on several different aspects of breast health and cancer including:

  • Risk factors, including hereditary occurrences of caner and certain genetic markers
  • Different types of breast cancer
  • Different types of screenings for breast cancer
  • Ways to reduce the risks of breast cancer including diet, exercise, and preventative mastectomy

Please consult with your doctor about any questions you have about breast cancer, including risks, tests, and treatments.

Using Ancestry.com DNA Results to Solve Genealogical Mysteries

 

Please join us as we conclude National Family History Month with a look toward the future of genealogical studies through DNA testing.  What family legends can you confirm or deny through this new and evolving form of ancestry discovery?  What new and exciting discovers can you reveal about yourself?  Joseph R. Klett, director of the State Archives and longtime genealogist, will discuss how he has utilized Ancestry.com DNA results for himself and other families members to explore and determine ancestral connections.   Find out how DNA results can dramatically change the trajectory of your research project.  

 

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Breast Health Lecture

In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the NJSL is proud to host a presentation on breast health on Friday, October 27th.  Patricia Tatrai, a certified health navigator at Capital Health Medical Center-Hopewell and oncology nurse for over 30 years will be presenting on a variety of topics surrounding breast cancer and overall breast health, including:

  • Breast Cancer Incidence
  • Risk Factors
  • Screening Guidelines
  • Screening Modalities
  • Cancer Genetics

Please join us for this informative session and spread the word about breast cancer!

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Researching Your Civil War Ancestors Recap

Courtesy of the New Jersey State Archives

Thank you to Jon Bozard, Reference Assistant at the New Jersey State Archives, for his informational presentation on Civil War ancestry.  Jon covered a variety of record types and collections that can be very useful for amateur and professional genealogists tackling the Civil War.  Popular resources available at the state archives include the Record of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War by William S. Stryker, Regimental Records, and the Federal Pensions.  Other less common resources include Payment Vouchers, Muster Rolls by Congressional District, New Jersey Home for Disabled Soldiers case files, and Photographs of Soldiers.  All of these collections can be viewed in-person at the State Archives.

Jon also highlighted some digital resources available through genealogical websites such as Ancestry and Fold3.  These collections include the U.S. Civil War Pension Index (Ancestry), a small number of Federal Pensions (Fold3), and the 1890 Veteran’s Schedule (Ancestry).  If you have any questions about the collections or are looking for direction in your research, please contact Jon Bozard at the State Archives or Regina Fitzpatrick, Genealogy Librarian the State Library.

Researching Your Civil War Ancestors

As the NJSL continues to celebrate National Family History month, please join us for Researching Your Civil War Ancestors.  Jon Bozard, reference assistant at the New Jersey State Archives, will cover the military records that are available at the Archives, and talk about what information you can and cannot expect to find there. He will also talk about records available at the National Archives in Washington DC, pension files and military service files, as well as show examples of some of the types of records you can find. There will also be information presented on other sites where there might be information of use to researchers.

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