Tag Archives: SLIC

Introduction to Finding Grants

Are you new to the field of grant seeking?  Discover what funders are looking for in nonprofits seeking grants and how to find potential funders in this introductory class.  This class will cover the 10 most important things you need to know about finding grants, and you will have an opportunity to do some hands-on funding research using the Foundation Directory Online Professional database.

*Registration is limited to 16 participants.  Please register only if you can attend*

 

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Interview Tips and Tricks Program Recap

The interview is the final stage to finally getting that new or dream job.  Your resume impressed, now it’s your chance to convince them that you are the best person for the job.  However, the interview process can be daunting and it’s important to be confident and well-spoken.  The following tips will help you build your interview skills and are applicable to any interview situation, from a preliminary phone interview to a formal panel interview.

First and foremost, it is important to prepare for your interview through a variety of ways.  You should have an understanding of your career goals so that you can effectively communicate them to others.  Also, be prepared to discuss everything in your resume and cover letter because you never know what questions will be asked of you.  Before the interview, look up some common interview questions and practice how you would answer.  Practicing your answers allows you to come up with appropriate responses and remain confident throughout the interview.  Check to make sure your social media presence is clean and appropriate as some employers may look to see what you are posting before deciding whether to extend an interview.  Avoid embarrassing or compromising pictures and stay away from public posts on controversial topics, such as politics or religion.

One of the most overlooked aspects of preparing for an interview is to research the company or organization.  By understanding more of the company’s values or goals, you can tailor your interview answer to align with them and find important information that you may want to ask about in the interview.  Look for mission statements, press releases, or strategic plans on their website or check out Glassdoor or LinkedIn for more information you can use to better inform your answers and career decisions.

Some of the most popular interview questions you should be familiar with are:

  • Tell me about yourself
  • What are your strengths/weaknesses
  • Where do you see yourself in ___ years
  • Tell me about a time when…

Being prepared to answer these questions with thoughtful and appropriate responses will set a positive tone for the interview process and demonstrate your confidence in your own abilities.  Let’s take a look at 2 methods to help us answer the different types of interview questions we may encounter.

The SHARP Method is designed to help you craft answers to more general or information questions, such as tell me about yourself or what are your strengths/weaknesses.   SHARP stands for:

S – Specific
H – Honest
A – Appropriate
R – Relevant
P – Positive

When asked about yourself, use the SHARP method to discuss your previous position(s) that are applicable to the field or career, talk about specific duties or accomplishments, and avoid negative critiques of former employers or supervisors.

For more situational questions that ask you how you handled a situation or need to elaborate on a specific outcome, use the SOAR Method.  SOAR stands for:

S – Situation
O – Obstacle
A – Action
R – Result

Clearly identifying each of these components in your response will demonstrate your ability to identify problems, weigh your options, and come to a reasonable solution to the obstacle.  These questions are designed to test your critical-thinking and problem-solving skills and are a great way to bring in experiences from other jobs that may not be related to the career or job your are currently in or applying for.  There are no “right” answers to these questions, so use positive examples from your past that highlight your qualifications.

It is important to point out that there are questions that employers are NOT allowed to ask you.  These relate to:

  • Martial status
  • Race, religion, national origin
  • Sex, gender identity, or sexual orientation
  • Disability or pregnancy
  • Current or previous salary/benefits (NJ specific)

If an interviewer attempts to ask you any of these questions, politely decline to answer and shift the focus back onto the job and your qualifications as a candidate.  Additionally, you should not ask about salary in the interview unless it is disclosed by the interviewer.  If you wish to know the salary of a position, you can inquire with the HR department, which may disclose that information, or check Glassdoor, through which current and former employees may post their salary and other useful information about the employer.

To obtain a copy of the presentation, please visit https://www.njstatelib.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/Interview-Tips-and-Tricks.pdf.

 

Interview Tips and Tricks

The interview process is the last hurdle in getting a new job, promotion, or starting a new career.  It is during the interview that you as an individual truly get to shine and finally explain why you are the best person for the job.  The interview can also be the most stressful part of the job-searching process because it often feels like one misstep could turn everything against you.  Fear not!  Join us as we walk you through the interview process and the most common interview questions and strategies for answering different types of questions.

 

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Planning for Retirement

Join us for a COMPLIMENTARY seminar from the Credit Union of New Jersey to help you better understand how people prepare for retirement. Retirement planning is the basis of a person’s future financial well-being and all their long-term financial plans.  Britany Enelow, Financial Advisor, will outline strategies you can use to help create a secure retirement plan, including:

  • Envisioning your Retirement
  • Building your Retirement Strategy
  • Sources of Retirement Income
  • Building your Nest Egg
  • Retirement Risks to Consider
NOT A CREDIT UNION DEPOSIT; NOT NCUA INSURED; NOT INSURED BY ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY; NOT GUARANTEED BY THE CREDIT UNION; MAY GO DOWN IN VALUE.
Securities, Investment Advisory and Financial Planning services offered through qualified registered representatives of MML Investors Services, LLC, Member SIPC: 222 Central Park Ave Suite 1100 Virginia Beach VA 23462 (757) 490-9041. Member Wealth Management and Credit Union of NJ are not subsidiaries or affiliates of MML Investors Services, LLC.  CRN202101-253093

 

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Webinar: Finding Your Women Ancestors in New Jersey Records

Thank you all for joining us yesterday to learn more about how to research your women ancestors in New Jersey genealogy collections.  Please see below for the link to the webinar recording.

Some things to remember when you’re strategizing how to locate your female ancestors:

1. Regardless of the time period in New Jersey, some form of marriage records have always been kept by civil authorities (not just churches). Women will always be listed by birth name (or previous married name if widowed) in these records.

Catherine Vulku Declaration of Intention, Burlington County

2.  Vital Records (birth, marriages, and deaths) were reported to the state of New Jersey beginning in May 1848.  Even if your woman ancestor was born pre-May 1848, check for any marriage or death records after May 1848, as these records will likely have authoritative biographical information.  Any New Jersey State vital records more than 100 years old are owned by the New Jersey State Archives.

3.  If your woman ancestor immigrated to the United States and applied for citizenship after 1920, regardless of her marital status, she will have her own naturalization application.  (In 1920, women in the United States were given the right to vote, thus becoming full citizens.  Prior to 1920, women naturalized under their husbands or fathers.)

4.  Always check land records!  These records can be genealogical gold mines that trace the purchase history of the property and spell out kinship between parties.

I hope you enjoyed the presentation!  Slides are available on the Guides and Handouts page of the Genealogy Research Guide.

WEBINAR – Finding Your Women Ancestors in New Jersey Records

Are you trying to research a female ancestor from New Jersey and don’t know where to start?  Regina Fitzpatrick, Genealogy Librarian at the New Jersey State Library will review how to find women in popular New Jersey genealogical collections.  Learn smart research strategies within individual collections and more about collections you may not have thought to check for your ancestor.

Click here to register!

Persist and Prevail: African American Family Achievements Program Recap

Thank you to Muriel Roberts and Barbara Polk Riley for sharing their family histories in honor of National Family History Month.  African American lineages can be difficult to trace further than a few generations and thanks to Muriel and Barbara, there are some tricks that may help people when searching for ancestors who were or came from former slaves.

A unique aspect to both of their families was the propensity to refer to people, especially males, by their middle names.  As a result, they ran into many roadblocks by searching for their ancestors, thinking that the name relatives called them was their first name when actually it was their middle name.  Oftentimes, names can be confirmed by checking vital records (birth, marriage, and death), which is why it is so important to obtain these documents when starting research on any ancestor.  They can confirm or reveal important information that can be used to identify other relatives, locations, and time periods with certainty.

Muriel Roberts was able to find a wealth of information through a little known source, the Works Progress Administration’s Slave Narratives, published between 1936-1938.  During the Great Depression, the Roosevelt Administration commissioned writers to produce books and documents on a wide variety of topics, one of which was to record interviews of former slaves.  Comprising of roughly 3,500 interviews, the Slave Narratives can provide a wealth of first-hand knowledge that can greatly influence one’s research into their African American lineage.  While the interviews were only 1-2 pages long, they contain important information such as names, both family and owners, locations, including during and after slavery, and occupations.  These narratives can be a major breakthrough and a hidden treasure trove for anyone researching slave ancestry.

It is also important to consider DNA testing when dealing with African American ancestry.  In some cases, a person’s ancestors may have been the offspring of a white owner and African slave.  This may be revealed through matches in a person’s DNA which can lead to more avenues for one to look, including wills that may confirm the presence of a slave ancestor.

Anyone who can prove ancestry to a slave can join the lineage society of the Sons and Daughters of the United States Middle Passage.  As a lineage society, there are stringent requirements regarding what documents are needed to prove direct ancestry, but the society has many resources available to its members that can help further along genealogical research.

WEBINAR – Shining a Light on Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in all Levels of New Jersey Government CANCELLED

Our tax dollars fund the State of New Jersey so it is important to ensure that our money is being spent properly.  Fraud, waste, and abuse cause unnecessary burdens to be placed on not only the taxpayer, but different branches, departments, and agencies.  In 2007, the Office of the State Comptroller was created to battle fraud, waste, and abuse through accountability, audits, and investigations.  It also provides an avenue for citizens and groups to report suspected abuse, fraud, or waste to help the agency carry out it’s duties.  Please join us as Nicole Acchione and Rich O’Brien of the New Jersey Office of the State Comptroller, Investigations Division, discuss the work of their office and what you can do if you suspect government fraud, waste or abuse.

 

Persist and Prevail: African American Family Achievements

Tracing African American lineage in the United States can be very difficult, especially if one’s ancestors were slaves.  While records were kept listing slaves as property, often times they did not include the name of the slave and if they did, it was only a first name.  Please join us as Muriel “Dee Dee” Roberts and Barbara Riley Polk discuss how a 1938 Works Progress Administration slave narrative helped answer their family questions and expanded their research.  They will also touch on how DNA testing was able to confirm their findings.

Dee Dee is currently serving her 4th year as Secretary and 9th year as Membership Chairperson for the New Jersey Chapter of the Afro–American Historical and Genealogical Society.   She is also a member of the Hudson County Genealogical Society and a charter member of SDUSMP, Sons and Daughters of the United States Middle Passage.

Barbara Riley was a professional librarian for over 40 years and is an amateur historian and a collector of books of the African American experience.  She also volunteers in the Local History Department at the Plainfield Public Library.

 

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Picturing Your Research: Finding, Procuring, and Preserving Images

There is an old saying that pictures are worth a thousand words.  While this may be up for debate, what is true is that a photo is worth nothing if it is destroyed.  Many of us have family photos that we consider precious and want to pass down, but we must first preserve those images.  Michelle Novak, a professional genealogist, shared some of her secrets for not only preserving family photos, but also ways to find and procure photos that have genealogical relevance.

Photos bring life and reality to one’s genealogy.  They not only show us how an individual or location appeared at a given period of time, but also tell us more about the life they lived.  Most of the time, photos are passed down within the family, but there are other sources from which one can find personal or relevant photos to augment one’s collection or inform their research.  National repositories such as the Library of Congress, National Archives II, or Historic Aerials as great places to check, as well as local organizations such as the NJ State Archives or local historical societies.  While they may not have named individuals associated with a picture, they may have location-specific pictures that can include former properties, places of employment, or public gatherings in which a family member may appear.  Additionally, photo sharing sites such as FamilySearch or Facebook Groups are a great way to exchange photos that extended family or unknown familial connections may have.

Before we discuss how to preserve images, it is important to point out that all photos are copyrighted material.  The copyright holder of a photograph is the individual who took the picture, not the subject of the photograph.  According to U.S. copyright law, a photograph becomes public domain 70 years after the death of the copyright holder.  However, this only applies if you plan on using the images for any commercial or reproduction purposes, which includes sharing it on public sites such as Facebook.  Additionally, it is important to think about the wishes of the subject/subjects of the photograph before sharing it; is this something that they would want others to see?  One tool to help track down the origin of an image, such as one that was used as a feature image on a genealogy blog, is Google Reverse Image Search.  You can upload the file and Google will attempt to track down all of the sources where the image is found online.

So now that we have all of our photographs, how do we keep them safe?  First and foremost, all photographs will age and degrade, regardless of how we store them or try to preserve them.  However, limiting their exposure to light and storing them in archival sleeves will certainly help slow any degradation.  Sleeves that have a PAT Passed designation are certified to be of the highest archival quality.  Additionally, storing certain photos in a freezer will help slow down any degradation.

The easiest and best way to “preserve” a photograph is to make a digital scan.  Scanners are considerably cheaper than 10 years ago and have such high resolution capabilities that you can make very good copies of your photos.  Additionally, scanning photographs will allow you to enlarge small photographs to see in greater detail.  Standard flatbed scanners are the best when dealing with photographs and you should avoid All-in-One machines as their scanning software and capabilities are much worse when dealing with the details of a photograph.  Michelle’s mantra is “do it once and do it well”, which means scan your photographs using the highest resolution you can.  The minimum recommended resolution is 600 ppi (pixels per inch), with most modern scanners being able to capture images in 2,400 or 3,600 ppi.  Additionally, you can purchase flatbed scanners that will also create positive images of slides and negatives.

Once you have your photos scanned, it is important to come up with a file-naming convention that will allow you to easily identify any photograph.  Having a photo named grandma.jpg tells you very little about the photo; please see page 5 of the handout for examples of how to name your files in more detail.  Also, you can use photo-editing programs, such as Adobe Photoshop, to extend the canvas of the photo to include important information, including image location, date, subject of the photo, or whatever else you feel is important to know about the image.

For more information about finding and preserving your photos, please take a look at the handout, https://www.njstatelib.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Picturing-Your-Research.pdf, or contact Michelle Novak at mnovakdesign@me.com.

Affordable Care Act

 

The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on March 23, 2010 was a major change for health insurance in the United States.

Among other features, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) meant that people enrolled in an ACA Marketplace plan cannot be denied health insurance coverage for pre-existing conditions, and children can remain on their parents’ health plan until age 26. In addition, many states expanded Medicaid in order to cover more people in certain income groups.

You can find detailed and up-to-date information about the Affordable Care Act on the New Jersey State Library Affordable Care Act Research Guide.

The open enrollment period for the ACA Federally-facilitated Marketplace (also known as the Federally-facilitated Exchange) has changed since the law was implemented.

Here are the 2020 important dates & deadlines:

  • 2020 Open Enrollment starts Friday, November 1, 2019.
  • The last day to sign up for 2020 coverage is Sunday, December 15, 2019.
  • Coverage for people who sign up during Open Enrollment starts January 1, 2020.

Some states have built their own State-based Marketplace and may have different Open Enrollment periods.

For insurance starting in January 2020, New Jersey remains on the Federally-facilitated Marketplace, and so residents will enroll through HealthCare.gov between November 1, 2019 and December 15, 2019.

New Jersey plans to transition to a State-based Marketplace/Exchange for 2021.

New Jersey requires residents to maintain health insurance. The New Jersey Health Insurance Market Preservation Act is a law that requires all NJ residents to have minimum essential health coverage throughout 2019 and beyond, unless you qualify for an exemption.

The HealthCare.gov web site provides help and information about many topics including enrollment during and outside of the Open Enrollment period, what plans cover, canceling plans, dental coverage, dates and deadlines, how to pick a plan, how to estimate income, and much more.

Information on some frequently requested topics can be found here:

In addition to online help, there is a toll free number available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week (except holidays): 1-800-318-2596 (TTY: 1-855-889-4325).

You can also search by zip code or city to find local, trained, in-person assisters to help you enroll.

 

Specific for New Jersey

Get Covered New Jersey provides health coverage information to New Jersey residents, connecting them with Healthcare.gov, and/or NJ FamilyCare.

NJ FamilyCare is New Jersey’s health insurance program that provides free or low-cost health coverage for qualified residents of any age. It’s also known as Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Enrollment in NJ FamilyCare can take place any time.

Picturing Your Research – Finding, Procuring, and Preserving Images

Did you realize that you have a UNIQUE, never shared before collection of archival materials in your house right now? Your family photos!  Your research can come alive with images, but finding, scanning, and preserving them can be a daunting prospect. In this talk, we’ll look at all three—from the perspective of a designer, photographer, researcher, and archivist (in training). Michelle D. Novak will give us an introduction on how to best scan the images you have, ways to find images in collections to supplement your research, new online resources to help identify those mystery people, and share some tips for protecting the photos and artifacts for future generations. (P.S., It’s her favorite talk and a hot-topic!)

Michelle D. Novak is a brand designer at [MND] (mnd.nyc) which serves finserv, education, and technology clients; genealogist; and teacher. She is a Master of Information student (formerly, MLIS) at Rutgers University in archives and digitization, holds a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, and certificates from Boston University, Gen-Fed, and the Genealogical Institute of Pittsburgh, among others. Novak is Trustee and Webmaster for the Genealogical Society of Bergen County (GSBC), New Jersey, and a former Trustee of the Genealogical Society of New Jersey (GSNJ). She also serves as Project Administrator for the GSNJ-NJSA New Jersey Early Land Records Project (a joint project between the Genealogical Society of New Jersey and the New Jersey State Archives); Editor of the GSBC’s national award-winning newsletter, The Archivist; and is involved with numerous transcription, indexing, publicity, and digitization projects.

 

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